An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Wall Street Journal (Warning: may be paywalled; alternative ): Equifax said, in a document submitted to the Senate Banking Committee and reviewed by The Wall Street Journal, that cyberthieves accessed records across numerous tables in its systems that included such as tax identification numbers, email addresses and drivers’ license information beyond the license numbers it originally disclosed. The revelations come some five months after Equifax announced it had been breached and personal information belonging to 145.5 million consumers had been compromised, including names, Social Security numbers, dates of birth and addresses. It’s unclear how many of the 145.5 million people are affected by the additional including tax ID numbers, which are often assigned to people who don’t have Social Security numbers. Hackers also accessed email addresses for some consumers, according to the document and an Equifax spokeswoman, who said “an insignificant number” of email addresses were affected. She added that email addresses aren’t considered sensitive personal information because they are commonly searchable in public domains.

As for tax ID numbers, the Equifax spokeswoman said they “were generally housed in the same field” as Social Security numbers. She added that individuals without a Social Security number could use tax ID number to see if they were affected by the hack. Equifax also said, in response to questions from The Wall Street Journal, that some additional drivers’ license information had been accessed. The company publicly disclosed in its Sept. 7 breach announcement that drivers’ license numbers were accessed; the document submitted to the banking committee also includes drivers’ license issue dates and states.

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