SpaceX is about to launch two demonstration satellites, and it is on to get the Federal Communications Commission’s permission to offer satellite internet service in the U.S. “Neither development is surprising, but they’re both necessary steps for SpaceX to enter the satellite broadband market,” reports Ars Technica. “SpaceX is one of several companies planning low-Earth orbit satellite broadband networks that could offer much higher speeds and much lower latency than existing satellite internet services.” From the report: Today, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai proposed approving SpaceX’s application “to provide broadband services using satellite technologies in the United States and on a global basis,” a commission announcement said. SpaceX would be the fourth company to receive such an approval from the FCC, after OneWeb, Space Norway, and Telesat. “These approvals are the first of their kind for a new of large, non-geostationary satellite orbit, fixed-satellite service systems, and the Commission continues to process other, similar requests,” the FCC said today. SpaceX’s application has undergone “careful review” by the FCC’s satellite engineering experts, according to Pai. “If adopted, it would be the first approval given to an American-based company to provide broadband services using a new of low-Earth orbit satellite technologies,” Pai said.

Separately, CNET reported yesterday that SpaceX’s Falcon 9 launch on Saturday will include “[t]he first pair of demonstration satellites for the company’s ‘Starlink’ service.” The demonstration launch is confirmed in SpaceX’s FCC filings. One SpaceX filing this month that a secondary payload on Saturday’s Falcon 9 launch will include “two experimental non-geostationary orbit satellites, Microsat-2a and -2b.” Those are the two satellites that SpaceX previously said would be used in its first phase of broadband testing.


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