An anonymous reader shares a report: Community college is not flashy and does not make promises about your future employability. You will also likely not learn current way-cool web development technologies like React and GraphQL. In terms of projects, you’re more likely to build software for organizing a professor’s DVD or textbook collection than you are responsive web apps. I would tell you that all of this is OK because in community college computer science classes you’re learning fundamentals, broad concepts like data structures, algorithmic complexity, and object-oriented programming. You won’t learn any of those things as deeply as you would in a full-on university computer science , but you’ll get pretty far. And community college is cheap, though that varies depending on where you are. Here in Portland, OR, the local community college network charges $104 per credit. Which means it’s possible to get a solid few semesters of computer science coursework down for a couple of grand. Which is actually amazing. In a new piece published in the Communications of the ACM, Silicon Valley researchers Louise Ann Lyon and Jill Denner make the argument that community colleges have the potential to play a key role in increasing equity and inclusion in computer science education. If you haven’t heard, software engineering has a diversity . Access to education is a huge contributor to that, and Denner and Lyon see community college as of a solution in plain sight.


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